Tag Archive | "vagabonding"

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

We’re All Full of Shit – David Duchovny Would Agree

Posted on 18 August 2009 by Carl

90705344 7fd0ce01ee d Were All Full of Shit   David Duchovny Would Agree

Live any honestly self reflective life and you’ll have this thought:

“I’m full of shit.”

Occasionally paired with this thought:

“I hope no one else notices.”

I know I do.  More often than I’d like actually.

So where is all this coming from?  Clay brought it up when we met up for brunch on my roadtrip.

“People are full of shit.” That’s what he said.

I laughed.  I knew it was true.

Look at it this way.  There is this epic joke that one day people are going to catch on to.  That I’ve really no clue as to how to live and have just been ranting and raving lunatic things.  That’s how I’m certain it looks.  We’re on the edge – our unconventional lifestyles, vagabonding, freedom businesses, liberation manifestos, working for no man…  we teeter very close to lunacy (not that I mind).

So we’ve got to push the joke past the limits.  You’ve got to believe your own joke.

Really, that’s it.  Being the real deal is doing it even when you don’t believe yourself.  You’ve got a mission, the hard facts of life, and the road before you.  If the words that come out of your mouth feel fake – fake it.  Sometimes to be the real deal we have to act it, like David Duchovny.

That’s right.  You’ve got to be so full of it that you can fool yourself into believing it’s possible.  That’s your game.  It isn’t just positive affirmations and productivity tools it’s about action in the face of self doubt.

Once you’ve got that.  You’ve got it.

As long as you’re the only person to catch on – good – the longer you can get away with it.

Cause, really, we’re all full of shit.

Flickr photo courtesy of danny.hammontree.

Also, this post in no way has been endorsed by David Duchovny – even though I think it should be.

Comments

Tags: , ,

Today I Am Lost Again

Posted on 11 August 2009 by Carl

lost Today I Am Lost AgainVagabonding is a life of letting go.

Of things.  Of places.  Of people.

Each day is new, unique, fresh.  Yet the day before is gone, a shadow, a memory of the road you can’t turn around on.  As a wanderer of the globe you are not rooted in one place.  You will meet amazing people, you will love them, then you will leave.  Your life is not there.  It’s out on the road.  One you have chosen, perhaps one that has chosen you.

That road calls.

It is not about falling asleep content at home.  It is collapsing – exhausted – wherever you may be because you have spent all you have in the world.

“When will you understand that being normal isn’t necessarily a virtue? It rather denotes a lack of courage.”

One day another road may call, it may reunite you with a world you once knew but the time is not now.  It is not time to step off your road.  Instead…

Strive to break the world.  When it shatters a new one is revealed.

Embrace the impermance.  Love the temporary.  Live it fully.

Vagabonding is about losing yourself.  Then finding yourself.  Then getting lost all over again.  Without the lows (the letting go) the highs (the experiencing) would never be revealed.  We only know what we had once it’s gone.  And for vagabonds, we are always going.

Vagabonding reveals to us that which a stationary life cannot for we are always in the process of losing something.

Today I am lost again.

Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Life In A Backpack: An Exercise in Minimalist Living

Posted on 13 July 2009 by Carl

100 Items or Less

When was the last time you considering the things you carried.

I’m not talking about emotions and the past, I’m talking about the objects in your life.

Even if you don’t carry them around with you everywhere you go (as I do) – you carry them with you in life.

Possessions weigh on you by attaching you to the world, to a place, to things.  The modern brand of Western consumerism driven by the cradle-to-grave philosophy encourages status by possession and not status by merit.  And when those possessions are no longer interesting it’s time to stuff them into corners and leave them forgotten.

Yet they are still there.  They weigh upon your freedom.

Examine the things you carry with you in life.

Are they necessary?  Do they contribute to your life in a meaningful way?  Are they just a way of showing status to others?

Cut the cords of attachment to possessions, reduce the clutter, and go on with a minimalist living.

My Minimalist Living Story:

Recently I re-considered the things I carry when my suitcase died.  I sought out a replacement and settled on the 22″ E-Motion 4.0 Trek Pack Plus.  It is quite a bit smaller than my old suitcase which forced me to minimize.

And so my 100 Item Challenge is underway.

My initial list was around 90 items.  I was already under 100 items – a surprising fact.

So, when I ended up in Maine for a week long respite from the world, I thinned down my travel gear once more and below is the final list.  Some of the items are listed as collections which made the challenge a little easier.

My final total: 77 items.

  • 4 Ties
  • 3 Scarves
  • 1 Belt
  • 1 Set of Suspenders
  • 1 Pair of Florsheim Dress Shoes
  • 1 Pair of White Leather Keds
  • 1 Hat
  • 1 White Linen Jacket
  • 2 Pairs of Dress Pants
  • 1 Pair of Jeans
  • 1 Pair of Shorts
  • 10 T-Shirts / Short Sleeve Shirts
  • 5 Dress Shirts / Long Sleeve Shirts
  • 2 Sweaters
  • 1 Black Pin-Stripe Vest
  • 1 Sweater Vest
  • 7 Pairs of Boxer Briefs
  • 7 Pairs of Socks
  • 1 Travel Towel
  • 1 External Hard Drive with Cable
  • 1 MacBook Pro with Cables, Extra Battery and Bluetooth Mouse
  • 1 iPhone 3G with Cable and vModo Duo Headphones
  • 1 Extra Internal Hard Drive
  • 1 LED Flashlight
  • 1 Wallet
  • 1 Washboard with Thimbles and Brushes
  • 1 Book Collection
  • 1 Pen Collection
  • 1 Journal
  • 1 Moleskin Pocket Reporters Notebook
  • 1 Pad of Graph Paper
  • 1 Pad of Yellow Notepaper
  • 2 Small Pilates Balls
  • 1 Set of Exercise Bands
  • 1 Bar Soap
  • 1 Shaving Kit (Merkur Safety Razor, Brush and Shave Soap)
  • 1 Stick Deodorant
  • 1 Bottle of Pain Relievers
  • 1 Toothbrush
  • 1 Container of Hel Gel
  • 1 Passport
  • 1 Thermos
  • 1 Victorinox 22″ E-Motion 4.0 Trek Pack Plus
  • 1 Chrome Metropolis Messenger Bag

What Do You Carry?

Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Vagabonding as a Radical Life Choice – Video Blog 9

Posted on 22 June 2009 by Carl

Vagabonding is a radical life choice which departs greatly from the stationary communities and homes of conventional society. However, while people may not understand the path and may look negatively upon the choice to break from the norm vagabonding is a personal, almost spiritual, path and not one of elitism or superiority.

Comments

Tags: , , ,

5 Months on the Road

Posted on 21 May 2009 by Carl

Published initially on my travelogue Vagabond Cafe on April 29th, 2009.  Edited with notes in () for those who may not know me personally.

We travel, initially, to lose ourselves; and we travel, next, to find ourselves.

Pico Iyer

Carl & the AmperstandI have been on the road for over 5 months.  I’ve visited 14 cities in that time and will be revisiting a few more in the next month.

There is a lot to traveling and when it began I didn’t really know where it was going or where I was going.  Not just in an uncertain sense of what city I would visit next but where I was going in my life.  I wanted to lose myself.

I was just starting to deal with the loss of my best friend / girl friend from almost a year prior, I had a lot of emotional baggage tying me down to bad habits in life; with people, with money, with myself and my health.

In these five months I have built a blog on Lifestyle Design (you’re here) and started working on networking and writing for it seriously.  I have taken control of my finances and paid down a good chunk of credit card debt that I accumulated last year.  I have helped spread the love of dance and the passion for life that it has given me.  I have undertaken a serious learning project to create an online business within three months.  I have spent many great nights with friends, many days alone in cafes, many hours on planes, buses and trains.

Most importantly I remember going to bed one night after teaching in Cleveland, OH with Joanna (one of my teaching partners) and feeling supremely at peace.  It was definitely not like that not so long ago.

I woke up at some point about a year ago and I was exceptionally unhappy.  I was working long hours and making decent money, traveling to dance a lot on weekends, and neglecting the most important person who I shared my life with.  I was drinking too often.  I was running from my life.  I knew I needed to change things.

It’s almost been a year and change has come. (It will be one year in 1 week from now.)

I have changed and my world has changed.  I have found myself.

I am willing to take risks and dive into my days to make them meaningful to me.  I am finding a new joy in working, in teaching, in writing.  I want to share my passion for life as art, to create my life deliberately and reflectively.

I want to spread the art of living.  Through dance.  Through words.  Through friends.  Through sharing time.  Through sharing space.

Today I am alive.  Tomorrow I will be somewhere else but I’ll have a passion, a purpose, dreams and values that I hold to, that guide my decisions.

Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

5 Books to Read Before Hitting the Road

Posted on 09 April 2009 by Carl

When you hit the road for the first time there are a lot of things that are going to turn around and hit you back. Having a little preparation to deal with these things and some inspiration to keep you going is important.

Here’s what I read before hitting the road.

1. Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Longterm World Travel

Rolf Potts is an amazing writer who has traveled all across the globe. He writes regularly at Vagablogging.net and has been featured in magazines like National Geographic Traveler, Outside, the New York Times Magazine and many more.

Vagabonding covers the basics of life on the road from before you even start. How to prepare for your trip, how to decide where to go, how to decide what to do when you get there, and much more. It’s less about specifics and more about learning how we want to travel in our own way.

This is one book that has stayed with me every step of my trip.

Buy it on Amazon.com before you get out there.

2. On the Road

Jack Kerouac was the American vagabond of the mid-20th century. Screaming across the country in cars from coast-to-coast, exploring cities and delving deep into life on the road as a spiritual experience, Kerouac has been the inspiration for many who roadtrip or travel.

Reading On the Road for the first time gives you a feel for the density of experience that vagabonding will provide. When you are out there on the road and hit a few bumps it is doubtfully as troublesome as the adventures that Kerouac went through.

I read this when I was in high school and have since read it over and over again. When you need a hit to jump start your passion again, this is one for me and hopefully you.

Buy it on Amazon.com and feel the rush.

3. A Walk in The Woods: Rediscovering America on The Appalachian Trail

Bill Bryson is one of my favorite authors hands down. His wit and the lightness with which he describes adversities he faces takes the wind out of that daunting first step.

When you set out to hike the Appalachian trail you are making a statement to yourself.

When you set out to vagabond across the country or the world you are making a statement to yourself.

It’s not about being a nonconformist or breaking from the mold necessarily, it is a personal pilgrimage to find out who you are and what you are made of. Bill Bryson gives us an insight into what makes him him.

Buy it on Amazon.com and take a hike.

4. The Four Hour Workweek

If Rolf Potts is the travel writer of the age, Timothy Ferriss is the entrepreneur who can show you how make the time to travel. This was the first book that really turned me onto traveling in a manner that made sense to me.

The Four Hour Workweek has a number of tools on how to divorce yourself from the incessant streams of information that we are bombarded with, create a business that will help fund your traveling, and a great deal more.

The title was purposefully chosen to create a bit of controversy, and yes it sounds a bit like a scam, but the ideas behind it are powerful and the motivation it gave me (one of the best slackers) to really work at redesigning my life is impressive.

Buy it on Amazon.com and see how many hours you want to put.

5. Your suggestions

What would a list be at only four? The fifth book is up to you, what else would you suggest to read before traveling?

Comments